Sukiyaki

sukiyaki8Sukiyaki is a famous Japanese dish. It is in the category of nabemono, dishes that are often cooked and eaten communally at the table. Sukiyaki is made with beef and a sweet soy sauce base. It’s especially good in the winter. The beef and other ingredients are often dipped into beaten raw egg before eating. It may sound strange to Americans, but try it once before you decide! In Japan, eggs are very safe and often eaten raw or half-cooked.

Ingredients
80mL (1/3 cup) soy sauce
3 tbsp sake
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup water

thinly sliced beef
shirataki noodles
negi (long green onion) or leek, sliced diagonally
yakidofu (grilled tofu) or firm tofu
greens (in Japan, I like mizuna, shungiku, or komatsuna; in America you can also use napa cabbage, spinach, etc.)
mushrooms (shiitake, enokitake)
udon noodles

eggs (optional)

Instructions

Mix the soy sauce, sake, sugar, and water together. (Note: In Japan you can also buy pre-made sukiyaki sauce.)

Heat a frying pan on a stove-top burner. Add a little oil, and add some sliced beef. Let brown, and then add some sukiyaki sauce. Next, add a little of each ingredient, cover, and let cook until the ingredients are done.

If you want to eat the sukiyaki with egg, each person can take one egg and crack it into their bowl. Then, each person can take what they like from the pan and place it into their bowl.

This cycle can be repeated until the ingredients are gone. Finally, you can add udon (thick wheat noodles) to end.

Homemade Vegetable Bouillon

This isn’t the most attractive recipe I’ve made, but its lack of aesthetic appeal is definitely made up for in convenience and taste. This “bouillon” is more like a paste made of vegetables and salt; it can be kept in the freezer and used anywhere you’d use stock or bouillon, or anytime you need some salt and extra flavor.

Ingredients
3 cloves garlic
2 oz celery (I like to use the leafy ends)
2.5 oz leeks (Japan notes: I use negi, or “long green onion”)
3.5 oz carrots
1/3 oz parsley
2 oz tomato, chopped (canned is okay)
1 oz spinach leaves
2 oz onion
2.5 oz salt

Note on ingredients: I used what I had leftover and what was on sale at the grocery store today. You can vary this up using different green and colored vegetables to get the flavor you like.

Instructions

Blend all vegetables in a food processor until finely ground. Add salt and mix well.

Store in the freezer; the salt will prevent the paste from freezing through.

To use: I like 1 tsp of bouillon to 1 cup of water, but adjust this to taste.

This recipe makes a good quantity; about 2 cups. That would be 96 tsp, resulting in about 96 cups (= 6 gallons) of stock. Feel free to cut down the amounts to make less.